Mobile IoT Authors: Elizabeth White, Ram Sonagara, Carmen Gonzalez, William Schmarzo, Scott Allen

News Feed Item

Smart Metering in Europe - 9th Edition

NEW YORK, Nov. 8, 2012  /PRNewswire/ -- Reportlinker.com announces that a new market research report is available in its catalogue:

Smart Metering in Europe – 9th Edition

Executive summary

EU27+2 has 277 million metered electricity customers and the annual demand for electricity meters for new installations and replacements is in the range of 12–17 million units. Penetration for smart meters, providing more comprehensive functionality than basic meter data collections, was 18 percent at the end of 2011. By 2017, Berg Insight projects that the rate will increase to 56 percent, driven by large rollouts in Spain, France and the UK, in combination with nationwide rollouts in several smaller countries. The installed base of smart electricity meters is forecasted to grow at a compound annual growth rate of 20.5 percent between 2011 and 2017 to reach 154.7 million units at the end of the period. The high growth rate will be sustained until the end of the decade as nationwide rollouts are completed in France, the UK and several other countries. A decision by Germany to introduce smart metering would extend the strong momentum for smart meters in Europe into the 2020s. At the end of Q3-2012, eleven European countries had developed regulatory roadmaps for the full-scale introduction of smart meters. The latest new country to adopt this policy was Austria in April 2012. Sweden and Italy completed deployments at the end of 2009 and 2011, respectively and Finland will be ready by the end of 2013, followed by Estonia and Norway in 2017. France and Spain have set target dates in 2018, while Austria, Ireland, the Netherlands and the UK aim for nationwide rollouts to be completed during 2019/2020. Furthermore, the governments in Denmark and Malta have put their countries on track for full coverage of smart meters before the end of this decade by supporting rollouts by state-controlled electricity companies. Cyprus, Poland, Portugal and Romania are additional countries leaning towards regulation-driven smart meter rollouts. Germany currently prefers that rollouts should be industry-driven and considers only minor requirements for household customers with high electricity consumption. A cost benefit analysis of the business case for smart metering in Germany due in 2013 may however change this policy. Government attitudes towards smart metering in other European countries ranges from keen interest expressed through active support for large pilot projects to virtual indifference.

As a result of the massive replacements, smart meters will come to dominate the European electricity metering market, accounting for over 95 percent of the total volume. After reaching a low point of 2.6 million units in 2009, demand for smart meters recovered in 2011 as massive installations began in Spain. In 2014 the market is expected to reach an inflection point as mass rollouts begin in France, the UK, the Netherlands and several other countries. During the second half of the 2010s, Berg Insight expects that annual shipments of smart electricity meters will be in the range of 25–30 million units. The aggregate investment cost for the deployment of 110 million smart electricity meters in Europe between 2011 and 2017 is projected to around € 15.8 billion. Based on industry data the capital expenditure for a smart metering project in Western Europe can vary in the span of € 140–240 per metering point. In Central Eastern Europe the projected cost is around € 100–150 per metering point, due to lower labour costs. Next generation powerline communication (PLC) technologies are a key enabler for the new wave of smart meter rollouts in Europe. PLC is the dominant last-mile communication technology for smart meters on the European market with a market share of around 85 percent. The G3-PLC and PRIME initiatives, launched by ERDF and Iberdrola respectively in the late 2000s have now evolved into complete standards, supported by commercially available chipsets from leading semiconductor vendors. Both standards have been approved by the ITU and the industry associations created to promote them are now cooperating around the new more comprehensive G.hnem PLC standard. In addition, the IEEE has launched a widely supported PLC standards initiative. Berg Insight has the opinion that a certain degree of competition between PLC standards is a healthy driver for innovation that will do little harm by fragmenting the market. All standards largely use the same underlying technology, which enables semiconductor vendors to use the same core platforms to create many different types of PLC chipsets. Regional variations will always be inevitable due to the different characterstics of electricity networks around the world. When it comes to large-scale deployments, the balance between cost and desired performance will decide the choice between basic or more advanced PLC standards.

Table of Contents

Table of Contents. i
List of Figures
Executive summary..1
1 Electricity, gas and district heating markets in Europe 3
1.1 Energy industry players3
1.2 Electricity market 5
1.3 Gas market ..13
1.4 District heating market16
2 Smart metering solutions....17
2.1 Introduction to smart grids ...17
2.2 Smart metering .20
2.2.1 Smart metering applications ....20
2.2.2 Smart metering infrastructure...24
2.2.3 Benefits of smart metering ..27
2.3 Project strategies ...29
2.3.1 System design and sourcing ...29
2.3.2 Rollout and integration ...30
2.3.3 Implementation and operation .31
2.3.4 Communicating with customers ...31
2.4 Regulatory issues ..32
2.4.1 Models for the introduction of smart meters 32
2.4.2 Standards and guidelines ...33
2.4.3 Individual rights issues...36
3 Networks and communication technologies ....37
3.1 Smart grid communication networks ..37
3.1.1 Smart grid network architecture....39
3.1.2 Communication technology options..41
3.2 PLC technology and vendors....42
3.2.1 International standards organisations44
3.2.2 G3-PLC..46
3.2.3 PRIME....48
3.2.4 Meters & More.50
3.2.5 LonWorks ...51
3.2.6 HomeGrid...52
3.2.7 HomePlug...52
3.2.8 Semiconductor companies .54
3.3 RF technology and vendors .60
3.3.1 International standards organisations61
3.3.2 Wi-SUN..61
3.3.3 ZigBee ...62
3.3.4 WAVE2M62
3.3.5 Z-Wave ..63
3.4 Cellular technology and vendors....63
3.4.1 2G networks ....63
3.4.2 3G and 4G networks .64
3.4.3 Cellular M2M module vendors .64
4 Smart metering industry players...67
4.1 Meter vendors...67
4.1.1 Landis+Gyr 68
4.1.2 Itron ..73
4.1.3 Elster.76
4.1.4 AEM..78
4.1.5 Aidon 79
4.1.6 Apator....79
4.1.7 Circutor..80
4.1.8 Diehl Metering .80
4.1.9 EMH Metering..81
4.1.10 Elgama Elektronika ...81
4.1.11 Energomera82
4.1.12 GE Energy ..82
4.1.13 Hager83
4.1.14 Iskraemeco.84
4.1.15 Janz ..84
4.1.16 Kamstrup ....85
4.1.17 Orbis.85
4.1.18 Osaki Electric ..86
4.1.19 RIZ ....87
4.1.20 Sagemcom.87
4.1.21 Secure Meters .88
4.1.22 Sensus...89
4.1.23 Sogecam ....89
4.1.24 ZIV ....90
4.2 Smart grid solution providers ....90
4.2.1 ABB...91
4.2.2 ADD Grup...91
4.2.3 Connode92
4.2.4 Corinex ..93
4.2.5 CURRENT...94
4.2.6 Dr Neuhaus 94
4.2.7 Echelon .95
4.2.8 Embriq...96
4.2.9 Metrima..96
4.2.10 NURI Telecom.97
4.2.11 Power Plus Communications ...97
4.2.12 POWRtec....98
4.2.13 Sentec ...98
4.2.14 Siemens.99
4.2.15 Silver Spring Networks.100
4.2.16 SmartReach...101
4.2.17 Trilliant .102
4.2.18 Xemex..103
4.2.19 ZPA Smart Energy...104
4.3 MDMS and middleware vendors ..104
4.3.1 Cuculus ....104
4.3.2 Ecologic Analytics ...105
4.3.3 eMeter..105
4.3.4 EnergyICT.106
4.3.5 Enoro...107
4.3.6 Görlitz ..107
4.3.7 Netinium ...108
4.3.8 Oracle ..108
4.3.9 Powel...109
4.3.10 SAP.110
4.4 System integrators and managed service providers..110
4.4.1 IT industry players ...111
4.4.2 Telecom industry players ..113
5 Market profiles ...117
5.1 Regional summary....117
5.1.1 EU smart metering policies ....117
5.1.2 National smart metering policies.119
5.1.3 Top smart metering projects in EU27+2 countries ..121
5.2 Austria...123
5.2.1 Electricity and gas distribution industry structure123
5.2.2 Metering regulatory environment 124
5.2.3 Smart metering market developments..125
5.3 Belgium.126
5.3.1 Electricity and gas distribution industry structure126
5.3.2 Metering regulatory environment and smart metering market developments .127
5.4 Bulgaria.128
5.4.1 Electricity and gas distribution industry structure128
5.4.2 Metering regulatory environment and smart metering market developments .129
5.5 Cyprus ..130
5.5.1 Electricity distribution industry structure....130
5.5.2 Metering regulatory environment and smart metering pilots...131
5.6 Czech Republic ...132
5.6.1 Electricity and gas distribution industry structure132
5.6.2 Metering regulatory environment and smart metering pilots...133
5.7 Denmark ....134
5.7.1 Electricity distribution industry structure....134
5.7.2 Metering regulatory environment 135
5.7.3 Smart metering market developments..136
5.8 Estonia..138
5.8.1 Electricity distribution industry structure....138
5.8.2 Metering regulatory environment and smart metering market developments .139
5.9 Finland ..140
5.9.1 Electricity distribution industry structure....140
5.9.2 Metering regulatory environment 143
5.9.3 Smart metering market developments..143
5.10 France...145
5.10.1 Electricity and gas distribution industry structure145
5.10.2 Metering regulatory environment and smart metering market developments .146
5.11 Germany....147
5.11.1 Electricity and gas distribution industry structure147
5.11.2 Metering regulatory environment 150
5.11.3 Smart meter market developments..152
5.12 Greece ..153
5.12.1 Electricity and gas distribution industry structure153
5.12.2 Metering regulatory environment and smart metering market developments .154
5.13 Hungary 154
5.13.1 Electricity and gas distribution industry structure155
5.13.2 Metering regulatory environment and smart metering market developments .156
5.14 Ireland...156
5.14.1 Electricity and gas distribution industry structure157
5.14.2 Nationwide program for deployment of smart meters ...157
5.15 Italy ..160
5.15.1 Electricity and gas distribution industry structure160
5.15.2 Metering regulatory environment 162
5.15.3 Smart metering market developments..163
5.16 Latvia164
5.16.1 Electricity and gas distribution industry structure164
5.16.2 Metering regulatory environment and smart metering market developments .165
5.17 Lithuania ....165
5.18 Luxembourg....166
5.19 Malta 167
5.19.1 Utility industry structure168
5.19.2 National smart grid project168
5.20 Netherlands ....169
5.20.1 Electricity and gas distribution industry structure169
5.20.2 Metering regulatory environment and smart meter market developments .171
5.21 Norway..173
5.21.1 Electricity distribution industry structure....173
5.21.2 Metering regulatory environment 174
5.21.3 Smart metering market developments and DSO rollout preparations ...176
5.22 Poland...178
5.22.1 Electricity and gas distribution industry structure178
5.22.2 Metering regulatory environment and smart metering projects ...179
5.23 Portugal 180
5.23.1 Electricity and gas distribution industry structure180
5.23.2 Metering regulatory environment and smart metering market developments .181
5.24 Romania182
5.24.1 Electricity and gas distribution industry structure182
5.24.2 Metering regulatory environment and smart meter market developments .183
5.25 Slovakia 184
5.25.1 Electricity and gas distribution industry structure184
5.25.2 Metering regulatory environment and smart meter market developments .185
5.26 Slovenia 185
5.26.1 Electricity industry structure and metering regulatory environment ..185
5.26.2 Smart metering projects....186
5.27 Spain187
5.27.1 Electricity and gas distribution industry structure187
5.27.2 Metering regulatory environment 188
5.27.3 Smart metering market developments..189
5.28 Sweden.191
5.28.1 Electricity distribution industry structure....191
5.28.2 Metering regulatory environment 192
5.28.3 Smart metering market developments..193
5.28.4 The outcome of a regulation driven rollout 196
5.29 Switzerland 198
5.29.1 Electricity distribution industry structure....198
5.29.2 Metering regulatory environment and smart meter market developments .199
5.30 United Kingdom...200
5.30.1 Electricity and gas industry structure....200
5.30.2 Metering regulatory environment 203
5.30.3 Great Britain's planned nationwide smart metering system ....204
5.30.4 Early smart meter deployments ..206
5.30.5 Smart metering in Northern Ireland and the Channel Islands .207
6 Case studies: Smart metering projects in Europe....209
6.1 Enel..209
6.1.1 The Telegestore project in Italy...209
6.1.2 New generation of smart meters and system solutions.211
6.1.3 Endesa's smart metering project in Spain .211
6.1.4 Smart meter rollout plan for Romania ...212
6.2 ERDF212
6.2.1 The Linky Programme..213
6.2.2 System development and full-scale pilot ...215
6.3 E.ON 216
6.3.1 Sweden and Finland: Smart meter rollout and customer engagement pilot....217
6.3.2 Spain and the UK: Complete rollouts before 2020 ...219
6.3.3 Germany and Central Europe: Pilot projects and retail propositions220
6.4 Iberdrola ....221
6.4.1 The PRIME project ..222
6.4.2 Smart metering rollout in Spain ..222
6.5 British Gas .223
6.5.1 Corporate strategy for smart metering..224
6.5.2 Early smart meter deployments ..224
6.6 ESB..225
6.6.1 Results from communication technology trials....226
6.6.2 Results from consumer behaviour trials227
6.6.3 Results from cost benefit analysis....228
6.7 Fortum ..231
6.7.1 Smart meter rollout in Sweden....232
6.7.2 Smart meter rollout in Finland233
6.7.3 Smart meter rollout in Norway ....234
6.8 Eandis...234
6.9 Energa ..236
6.10 Eesti Energia...237
7 Market forecasts and trends ..239
7.1 Market drivers and restraints ...240
7.1.1 Macroeconomic factors240
7.1.2 Political environment ....242
7.1.3 Competitive environment ..244
7.1.4 Technology and standards ....245
7.2 Smart metering market forecast ...246
7.2.1 Geographical markets..247
7.2.2 Capital expenditure forecast ..252
7.3 Technology trends....255
7.4 Industry analysis..256
Glossary 259

List of Figures

Figure 1.1: Top 25 energy companies, by turnover (EU27+2 2011) .4
Figure 1.2: Electricity generation and consumption data (EU27 2011) ..5
Figure 1.3: Electricity market statistics (Europe 2012) ...7
Figure 1.4: Electricity market statistics (Europe 2012) ...8
Figure 1.5: Top 25 electricity DSOs (EU27+2 2012)....10
Figure 1.6: Top 25 electricity DSOs (Southeast and East Europe 2012) ...12
Figure 1.7: Gas market statistics (EU27+2 2012) ...14
Figure 1.8: Top 25 gas DSOs (EU27+2 2012) ...15
Figure 1.9: Major district heating markets (EU27+2 2008) ....16
Figure 2.1: Plug-in hybrid electric vehicle.23
Figure 2.2: Smart metering infrastructure.25
Figure 2.3: Examples of smart electricity meters26
Figure 3.1: Overview of power grid infrastructure....38
Figure 3.2: Standard model for smart grid communication network ....39
Figure 3.3: Alternative model for smart grid communication network ..40
Figure 3.4: Technical comparison of key PLC technology standards...43
Figure 3.5: Members of the G3-PLC Alliance by industry .47
Figure 3.6: Members of the PRIME Alliance by industry ...49
Figure 3.7: Members of the Meters & More Association by industry ....50
Figure 3.8: Selected members of HomePlug Powerline Alliance by industry .53
Figure 3.9: Top 25 semiconductor companies and smart grid technology support.59
Figure 4.1: Energy meter vendor company data (World/Europe, FY2011)68
Figure 4.2: Landis+Gyr smart metering product portfolio (Europe 2012) .69
Figure 4.3: Itron smart metering product portfolio (Europe 2012) ...74
Figure 5.1: Regulatory policies for smart meter rollouts, by country (EU27+2 Q3-2012) 120
Figure 5.2: Top 25 smart metering projects in EU27+2 countries (Q3-2012) ...122
Figure 5.3: Top 10 electricity and gas DSOs in Austria (2012)..124
Figure 5.4: Electricity and gas network operators in Belgium (2012) .127
Figure 5.5: Electricity DSOs and smart meters under contract in Bulgaria (2012) .129
Figure 5.6: Top 5 DSOs in the Czech Republic (2012) ...133
Figure 5.7: Top 10 electricity DSOs in Denmark (2012) ..135
Figure 5.8: Major SM projects in Denmark (October 2012)..137
Figure 5.9: Major SM projects in Estonia (October 2012) ....139
Figure 5.10: Top 10 electricity DSOs in Finland (2012)...141
Figure 5.11: Top 25 SM contracts in Finland (September 2012) ...142
Figure 5.12: Top 50 electricity DSOs in Germany (2012)149
Figure 5.13: Top 5 DSOs in Hungary (2012) ....155
Figure 5.14: Top 15 electricity and gas DSOs in Italy (2012) ....161
Figure 5.15: Electricity and gas DSOs in the Netherlands (2012)..170
Figure 5.16: Top 10 electricity DSOs in Norway (2012) ..174
Figure 5.17: Top 10 full-scale SM projects in Norway (Q3-2012)...177
Figure 5.18: Electricity DSOs in Poland (2012) 179
Figure 5.19: Top 5 DSOs in Portugal (2012) ....181
Figure 5.20: Top 5 DSOs in Romania (2012)....183
Figure 5.21: Electricity DSOs in Slovenia (2012)...186
Figure 5.22: Major electricity and gas DSOs in Spain (2012)....188
Figure 5.23: Top 10 electricity DSOs in Sweden (2012)..192
Figure 5.24: SM contracts awarded by top 10 DSOs in Sweden...194
Figure 5.25: SM vendor selection of medium sized DSOs in Sweden195
Figure 5.26: Features of smart meters in Sweden (2011) ....196
Figure 5.27: Communication technologies of smart meters in Sweden ..197
Figure 5.28: Top 10 electricity DSOs in Switzerland (2012) .199
Figure 5.29: Electricity DSOs in the UK (2012).201
Figure 5.30: Gas DSOs in the UK (2012) 202
Figure 5.31: Estimated electricity and gas retailer market shares in the UK (2012) ....202
Figure 6.1: Telegestore annual operational data in Italy (2011)210
Figure 6.2: Conceptual system architecture for ERDF's smart metering system....214
Figure 6.3: E.ON smart metering status by country (Europe 2012)....216
Figure 6.4: SM contracts awarded by E.ON Sweden (2005–2007)218
Figure 6.5: Comparison of data collection performance for PLC/RF/GPRS .227
Figure 6.6: Calculated NPV for smart metering rollout options in Ireland228
Figure 6.7: Estimated cost for smart electricity meters and network equipment ....229
Figure 6.8: Estimated overhead costs for smart metering in Ireland ..230
Figure 6.9: Estimated capital cost for a smart metering rollout in Ireland231
Figure 6.10: Estimated cost of Energa's smart metering project ...236
Figure 7.1: Household power consumption and retail prices (EU23+2 2012) ..241
Figure 7.2: Smart meter shipments and penetration rate (EU27+2 2011–2017)....247
Figure 7.3: Smart meter shipments by country (EU27+2 2011–2017) ....249
Figure 7.4: Smart meter installed base by country (EU27+2 2011–2017)....250
Figure 7.5: Smart metering capital expenditure forecast (EU27+2 2011–2017) ....252
Figure 7.6: Estimated capital cost for some smart metering projects in Europe ....253
Figure 7.7: Breakdown of costs for smart metering projects in Western Europe ...254

To order this report:
Electrical_Equipment Industry:
Smart Metering in Europe – 9th Edition

Contact Nicolas: [email protected]
US: (805)-652-2626
Intl: +1 805-652-2626


SOURCE Reportlinker

More Stories By PR Newswire

Copyright © 2007 PR Newswire. All rights reserved. Republication or redistribution of PRNewswire content is expressly prohibited without the prior written consent of PRNewswire. PRNewswire shall not be liable for any errors or delays in the content, or for any actions taken in reliance thereon.

@ThingsExpo Stories
In his keynote at 19th Cloud Expo, Sheng Liang, co-founder and CEO of Rancher Labs, will discuss the technological advances and new business opportunities created by the rapid adoption of containers. With the success of Amazon Web Services (AWS) and various open source technologies used to build private clouds, cloud computing has become an essential component of IT strategy. However, users continue to face challenges in implementing clouds, as older technologies evolve and newer ones like Docke...
As ridesharing competitors and enhanced services increase, notable changes are occurring in the transportation model. Despite the cost-effective means and flexibility of ridesharing, both drivers and users will need to be aware of the connected environment and how it will impact the ridesharing experience. In his session at @ThingsExpo, Timothy Evavold, Executive Director Automotive at Covisint, will discuss key challenges and solutions to powering a ride sharing and/or multimodal model in the a...
SYS-CON Events announced today that Embotics, the cloud automation company, will exhibit at the 19th International Cloud Expo, which will take place on November 1–3, 2016, at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA. Embotics is the cloud automation company for IT organizations and service providers that need to improve provisioning or enable self-service capabilities. With a relentless focus on delivering a premier user experience and unmatched customer support, Embotics is the fas...
Just over a week ago I received a long and loud sustained applause for a presentation I delivered at this year’s Cloud Expo in Santa Clara. I was extremely pleased with the turnout and had some very good conversations with many of the attendees. Over the next few days I had many more meaningful conversations and was not only happy with the results but also learned a few new things. Here is everything I learned in those three days distilled into three short points.
SYS-CON Events announced today that Coalfire will exhibit at the 19th International Cloud Expo, which will take place on November 1–3, 2016, at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA. Coalfire is the trusted leader in cybersecurity risk management and compliance services. Coalfire integrates advisory and technical assessments and recommendations to the corporate directors, executives, boards, and IT organizations for global brands and organizations in the technology, cloud, health...
The IoT industry is now at a crossroads, between the fast-paced innovation of technologies and the pending mass adoption by global enterprises. The complexity of combining rapidly evolving technologies and the need to establish practices for market acceleration pose a strong challenge to global enterprises as well as IoT vendors. In his session at @ThingsExpo, Clark Smith, senior product manager for Numerex, will discuss how Numerex, as an experienced, established IoT provider, has embraced a ...
Cloud based infrastructure deployment is becoming more and more appealing to customers, from Fortune 500 companies to SMEs due to its pay-as-you-go model. Enterprise storage vendors are able to reach out to these customers by integrating in cloud based deployments; this needs adaptability and interoperability of the products confirming to cloud standards such as OpenStack, CloudStack, or Azure. As compared to off the shelf commodity storage, enterprise storages by its reliability, high-availabil...
SYS-CON Events announced today that MathFreeOn will exhibit at the 19th International Cloud Expo, which will take place on November 1–3, 2016, at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA. MathFreeOn is Software as a Service (SaaS) used in Engineering and Math education. Write scripts and solve math problems online. MathFreeOn provides online courses for beginners or amateurs who have difficulties in writing scripts. In accordance with various mathematical topics, there are more tha...
@ThingsExpo has been named the Top 5 Most Influential Internet of Things Brand by Onalytica in the ‘The Internet of Things Landscape 2015: Top 100 Individuals and Brands.' Onalytica analyzed Twitter conversations around the #IoT debate to uncover the most influential brands and individuals driving the conversation. Onalytica captured data from 56,224 users. The PageRank based methodology they use to extract influencers on a particular topic (tweets mentioning #InternetofThings or #IoT in this ...
More and more brands have jumped on the IoT bandwagon. We have an excess of wearables – activity trackers, smartwatches, smart glasses and sneakers, and more that track seemingly endless datapoints. However, most consumers have no idea what “IoT” means. Creating more wearables that track data shouldn't be the aim of brands; delivering meaningful, tangible relevance to their users should be. We're in a period in which the IoT pendulum is still swinging. Initially, it swung toward "smart for smar...
Complete Internet of Things (IoT) embedded device security is not just about the device but involves the entire product’s identity, data and control integrity, and services traversing the cloud. A device can no longer be looked at as an island; it is a part of a system. In fact, given the cross-domain interactions enabled by IoT it could be a part of many systems. Also, depending on where the device is deployed, for example, in the office building versus a factory floor or oil field, security ha...
SYS-CON Events announced today that Transparent Cloud Computing (T-Cloud) Consortium will exhibit at the 19th International Cloud Expo®, which will take place on November 1–3, 2016, at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA. The Transparent Cloud Computing Consortium (T-Cloud Consortium) will conduct research activities into changes in the computing model as a result of collaboration between "device" and "cloud" and the creation of new value and markets through organic data proces...
Donna Yasay, President of HomeGrid Forum, today discussed with a panel of technology peers how certification programs are at the forefront of interoperability, and the answer for vendors looking to keep up with today's growing industry for smart home innovation. "To ensure multi-vendor interoperability, accredited industry certification programs should be used for every product to provide credibility and quality assurance for retail and carrier based customers looking to add ever increasing num...
@ThingsExpo has been named the Top 5 Most Influential M2M Brand by Onalytica in the ‘Machine to Machine: Top 100 Influencers and Brands.' Onalytica analyzed the online debate on M2M by looking at over 85,000 tweets to provide the most influential individuals and brands that drive the discussion. According to Onalytica the "analysis showed a very engaged community with a lot of interactive tweets. The M2M discussion seems to be more fragmented and driven by some of the major brands present in the...
In an era of historic innovation fueled by unprecedented access to data and technology, the low cost and risk of entering new markets has leveled the playing field for business. Today, any ambitious innovator can easily introduce a new application or product that can reinvent business models and transform the client experience. In their Day 2 Keynote at 19th Cloud Expo, Mercer Rowe, IBM Vice President of Strategic Alliances, and Raejeanne Skillern, Intel Vice President of Data Center Group and ...
Machine Learning helps make complex systems more efficient. By applying advanced Machine Learning techniques such as Cognitive Fingerprinting, wind project operators can utilize these tools to learn from collected data, detect regular patterns, and optimize their own operations. In his session at 18th Cloud Expo, Stuart Gillen, Director of Business Development at SparkCognition, discussed how research has demonstrated the value of Machine Learning in delivering next generation analytics to impr...
Data is the fuel that drives the machine learning algorithmic engines and ultimately provides the business value. In his session at Cloud Expo, Ed Featherston, a director and senior enterprise architect at Collaborative Consulting, will discuss the key considerations around quality, volume, timeliness, and pedigree that must be dealt with in order to properly fuel that engine.
What happens when the different parts of a vehicle become smarter than the vehicle itself? As we move toward the era of smart everything, hundreds of entities in a vehicle that communicate with each other, the vehicle and external systems create a need for identity orchestration so that all entities work as a conglomerate. Much like an orchestra without a conductor, without the ability to secure, control, and connect the link between a vehicle’s head unit, devices, and systems and to manage the ...
Virgil consists of an open-source encryption library, which implements Cryptographic Message Syntax (CMS) and Elliptic Curve Integrated Encryption Scheme (ECIES) (including RSA schema), a Key Management API, and a cloud-based Key Management Service (Virgil Keys). The Virgil Keys Service consists of a public key service and a private key escrow service. 

Web Real-Time Communication APIs have quickly revolutionized what browsers are capable of. In addition to video and audio streams, we can now bi-directionally send arbitrary data over WebRTC's PeerConnection Data Channels. With the advent of Progressive Web Apps and new hardware APIs such as WebBluetooh and WebUSB, we can finally enable users to stitch together the Internet of Things directly from their browsers while communicating privately and securely in a decentralized way.