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AjaxWorld Magazine: AJAX for Mobile Devices Will Be the Hallmark of "Mobile Web 2.0" in 2006

Why Mobile AJAX Will Be Preferred Over Java ME and XHTML

Recently, Opera announced the availability of AJAX on mobile devices through their browser. Considering the popularity of Opera in the browser market (especially in the mobile browser market), this announcement is indeed very significant. Having been involved in creating mobile services for a few years now, I believe AJAX will replace both Java ME and XHTML as the platform of choice for developing mobile applications.

Before I do so, a caveat – I believe that Mobile Web 2.0 is far more than ‘AJAX on mobile’. Mobile Web 2.0 involves applying all seven of the Web 2.0 principles to mobility. Here, I am discussing AJAX only i.e. only one facet of Web 2.0.

What is AJAX?
AJAX is an optional addition to Web 2.0. It is not a single technology. Rather, it’s a combination of a number of existing technologies acting together, namely:

  • XHTML and CSS for standards based presentation
  • Document Object Model for dynamic display and interaction
  • XML and XSLT for data interchange and manipulation
  • XMLHttpRequest for asynchronous data retrieval and
  • JavaScript to tie everything together

Until AJAX came along, it wasn't easy to replicate the rich and responsive interaction design of native applications. AJAX is different from other previous attempts in addressing this problem since it is based on existing, non-proprietary standards which are already familiar to developers.

In traditional web applications, most user action triggers an HTTP request. The server does some processing and returns the result back to the user. While the server is processing, the user waits! The ‘start-stop-start’ nature of web applications is good from a technical standpoint but not from a user interaction standpoint (since almost all user interaction is resulting in trips to the server and the user is waiting while the server is doing the work).

AJAX solves this problem by using the AJAX engine. At the start of the session, the AJAX application loads the AJAX engine. The AJAX engine is written in JavaScript as a JavaScript library and sits in a hidden frame. The user interacts with the AJAX engine instead of the webserver. If the user interaction does not require a trip to the server, the AJAX engine handles the interaction on its own. When the user interaction needs some data from the server, the AJAX engine makes a call asynchronously (via XML/XMLHttpRequest API ) without interrupting the user’s flow.

AJAX is ‘asynchronous’ in the sense that the AJAX engine is communicating with the server asynchronously to the user interaction. Thus, the user gets a seamless experience (i.e. the user is not waiting).

There's a momentum behind AJAX at the moment. Developers are already familiar with the technologies underlying it. All the technologies making up AJAX are mature and stable. AJAX is the foundation for many new applications on the web like Google suggest, Google Maps, some features of Flickr and Amazon’s A9.com.

Mobile Application Development Models and Their Shortcomings
From the above discussion and from the articles referenced , we can see that AJAX clearly solves two problems,  namely a superior UI and a standardized form of data retrieval. These two problems also apply to mobile devices and by extension, AJAX addresses them as well. However, I believe that it does far more! Specifically, it solves the following problems in the mobile context:

  1. The problem of market fragmentation
  2.  Porting woes (specific to downloading applications like those built on Java ME)
  3. Application distribution without ‘walls’

Additionally, it has the developer community behind it – which is a significant plus!

Let's consider existing mobile applications development. There are two principal ways to categorize mobile applications – Browsing applications and Downloading applications. There are others (like Messaging applications, SIM applications and embedded applications) - but a vast majority of the applications we see today fall under downloading or browsing applications.

Browsing applications: Browsing applications are conceptually the same as browsing the web but take into account limitations which are unique to mobility (for example - small device sizes). Similar to the web, the service is accessed through a microbrowser which uses a URL to locate a service on a wireless web server. The client is capable of little or no processing.

Downloading applications (Smart client applications): In contrast to browsing applications, downloading applications are applications that are first downloaded and installed on the client device. The application then runs locally on the device. Unlike the browsing application, a downloaded(or smart client) application does not need to be connected to the network when it runs. Downloading applications are also called ‘smart client’ applications because the client(i.e. the mobile device) is capable of some processing and / or some persistent storage (caching). Currently, most Java based games are downloaded applications i.e. they are downloaded to the client, require some processing to be performed on the client and need not be always connected to the network. Enterprise mobile applications such as sales force automation are often also examples of smart client applications.

Java ME is the most common mode of developing downloading applications and XHTML is most common way of developing browsing applications. Let's elaborate on the problems I have outlined before and then discuss how AJAX will solve them – potentially making XHTML and Java ME less relevant.

Problem One - Market fragmentation
Mobile applications are primarily consumer applications. The mobile data industry is an emerging industry. As with many industries in this phase of evolution, it is fragmented. To be commercially viable (especially considering the need for the network effect ), consumer applications need a large target audience.

This can come about either by a single proprietary standard such as BREW from Qualcomm (which obviously has its disadvantages) or through open standards not controlled by any one entity with few industry barriers.

To illustrate how market fragmentation affects commercial viability of a new service, I often recommend the following approach (most of the figures can be easily obtained from the web). The idea is to think in terms of ‘concentric circles’ in trying to find out the target audience for your application. 

Here's a sample set of steps I use:

  1. What is the population of the country where you are launching your application?
  2. What is the percentage of handset penetration amongst this population?
  3. Which operators are you targeting within this population? (Most countries have more than one mobile operator)
  4. Which handsets are you targeting within this population (not all operators support all handsets)?
  5. What is the technology of deployment for example Java, SMS, WAP etc?
  6. Does the application have any special technology needs such as location-based services? How many people have handsets equipped with this technology?
  7. What does a segmentation analysis of the subset reveal? (Simplest segmentation is male/female. Prepay/postpay etc)
  8. What are the channels to market for the segments we are targeting?
  9. What proportion of this subset do we expect to hit and convert to customers based on our marketing budget? (i.e. the conversion rate which can be typically 2% )

This will give you your target audience, and this target audience times number of potential downloads per month should give you an idea of your monthly revenue. This could then be tied against your cost base including your development costs, porting costs etc to arrive at a more tangible picture of success/failure of the new service.

The above methodology illustrates the problem of fragmentation and it implies that very few mobile services are profitable today. Thus, we have a proliferation of ‘broadcast content applications’ – e.g., ringtones, pictures but very few utility applications at a mass-market level.

Problem two - Porting woes
This problem is specific to downloaded applications (and more commonly Java ME). Write once run anywhere is a joke in the mobile context! – and through no fault of Sun. Consider the case of mobile games (a downloaded application) typically developed using Java ME.

First the good news...

  • Carriers such as Sprint and Vodafone report that mobile games and other data services now account for roughly 10 percent of their annual revenues;
  • Industry consulting firm Ovum notes that there are now more than 450 million Java-enabled handsets globally, in addition to the 38 million and 15 million BREW- and Symbian-enabled handsets;
  • Mobile-game publishers racked up $1.2 billion in global sales in 2004 and expect an even stronger year in 2005 as more and more consumers discover the tiny gaming consoles already in their pockets.

BUT then the pitfalls ..

  • Game porting generally requires developers to adapt to differences in screen resolution, processor speed, memory thresholds, and sound capabilities, all of which can vary wildly from device to device.
  • For publishers, this can not only exponentially increase game development and asset creation time, but can also cause them to miss critical time-to-market windows in a hyper-competitive industry.
  • As an example, imagine that you are a mid-sized game publisher with 30 games in your portfolio. To make your games available worldwide in five languages and on only 50 devices, you would need to create 7,500 different builds. At $2,500 per build, you would require a budget of nearly $19 million simply to handle porting.

This limits the business model severely and very few mobile games are profitable. (Author's note: original source for this section as per my blog Porting – the big barrier to entry with acknowledgements to Sameer Bhatia as per the blog)

Problem three - Application distribution without walls
The predicament of using Java ME as per the preceding example shows that it’s not enough to merely set up a community process as Sun has done (which works fine as far as the technology is concerned). The technology and the applications built upon it must remain homogeneous and interoperable to enable the network effect and gain critical mass. The fewer the ‘choke points’ for a platform, the better it is for the industry as a whole.

Why Will AJAX Replace Java ME and XHTML As the Preferred Mobile Development Platform?
Can AJAX solve the preceding problems? In my view, yes. AJAX is accessed through the browser. There are two ways a customer can get the browser – either the browser can be pre-installed on the phone by the manufacturer or it can be installed as a separate application

Anyone can download a browser for a smartphone as this Opera link shows for series 60 phones. This means all customers can potentially install their own browser and if enough people do, then we have critical mass with few ‘choke points’ – such as specific restrictions created by mobile operators. In other words, a means to bypass the walled garden.

Further, AJAX offers a superior user experience and already has the developer community supporting it. The possibility of attaining critical mass (due to fewer choke points) means more chance of monetizing the application – leading to a virtuous circle of better applications.

Java ME as it stands today is seriously flawed (not the technology but the business model). XHTML will be an ‘also ran’ because AJAX will offer a superior user experience. Hence, my belief that AJAX will be the preferred platform of choice for mobile applications at the expense of Java ME and XHTML.

Supporting Notes

  • I have said ‘preferred’ and not ‘replace’ i.e. I don’t expect AJAX to replace any technology
  • AJAX won’t solve all problems. You still need to create a service which is useful for mobile customers
  • AJAX is not the only attempt to create a better interface. There have been others with limited success but they are not across the industry(or are proprietary). For example mobile SVG from bitflash , superscape’s swerve technology for 3D gaming (which is the implementation of JSR 184 - Mobile 3D Graphics API for Java ME) and Macromedia (now Adobe) Mobile
  • Not a lot of people are actually browsing the mobile internet. Although WAP usage shows phenomenal growth, these figures include the use of WAP as a transport mechanism – typically for downloading content. In other words, every time you download a ringtone, you implicitly create a WAP page impression. I suspect the real figures used by consumers to actually browse the mobile internet are very low
  • Very few mobile operators have tried to engage with the developer community as such. Practically the only example I can think of is source o2
  • The plight of small developers can be illustrated from my discussions with a Korean vendor when I spoke at imobicon in Seoul. The vendor had finally managed to get his game listed on a UK portal. However, that was because a Korean aggregator managed to get a deal with a UK aggregator. Thus, he now had two aggregators and one operator taking a slice of revenue! Leaving him with very little. A sorry state of affairs. Surely, there must be a way to create and distribute applications globally i.e. you write for the browser and anyone who uses that browser can download and run your application
  • Mobile operators often argue that they handle billing and location services etc. That’s fine – but let’s first worry about getting the numbers. Also, billing comes at a cost and there may be better billing mechanisms on the web.

Summary
To recap, mobile applications are primarily consumer focused. They need critical mass. Currently, the market is fragmented and the current commercial model is broken. AJAX offers a potentially better solution in comparison to the incumbents (Java ME and XHTML) due to a combination of fewer potential choke points because of its distribution mechanism. The economic models do not favor Java ME and AJAX offers a superior user experience to XHTML. It has the support of the developer community.

Finally, note that I say AJAX will be ‘preferred’ model and not the ‘only’ model. I don’t expect AJAX to replace either Java ME or XHTML.

For a daily dose of Ajit Jaokar, readers might like to visit www.futuretext.com.

More Stories By Ajit Jaokar

Ajit Jaokar is the author of the book 'Mobile Web 2.0' and is also a member of the Web2.0 workgroup. Currently, he plays an advisory role to a number of mobile start-ups in the UK and Scandinavia. He also works with the government and trade missions of a number of countries including South Korea and Ireland. He is a regular speaker at SYS-CON events including AJAXWorld Conference & Expo.

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Most Recent Comments
Jose M. Arranz 07/08/08 12:06:20 PM EDT

Two years after this prediction is becoming a reality, today many mobile browsers support AJAX, the list is impressive:

Opera Mini 4, Opera Mobile 8.6, NetFront 3.5, Minimo 0.2, IE Mobile 6 (Windows Mobile 6), iPhone/iPod Touch, Android, S60WebKit (S60 3rd of Nokia phones), Iris 1.0.8 and QtWebKit embedded (Qt 4.4).

Some frameworks like [http://www.itsnat.org ItsNat] are exploiting this capability to bring the web 2.0 to the mobile world avoiding the tedious page to page navigation.

j 04/11/06 04:49:08 AM EDT

Mobile AJAX has a lot of potential, but faces the same limitations as every other mobile technology - mobile operator control of the end product.

In most markets, operators subsidize devices in order to spur demand through lower up-front prices of ever more capable handsets. In order to justify this subsidy, operators often resort to locking down not only the SIM slot, but also the application registry and execution environment. They do this so that on;y operator-approved apps can run, and developers have to pay the hefty operator toll in order to get their apps certified.

Opera may offer a decent mobile browser, but if mobile web apps running in Opera began to "leak revenue" through consumer uptake on apps/services not offered by the operator, operators will lock these devices down in order to reduce their subscriber's ability to install Opera (or equivalent).

Mobile phones aren't like PCs - the technology may be similar, but the business and channel model is fundamentally more complex and restricted for phones.

Unless operators can be sold on a story that enables them to monetize incrementally more of the data traffic, or their chokehold on control over the hw+sw+service offering can be loosened, mobile AJAX will remain a technology with a lot of unfilled potential.

j

SYS-CON Australia News Desk 04/06/06 11:55:03 AM EDT

Recently, Opera announced the availability of AJAX on mobile devices through their browser. Considering the popularity of Opera in the browser market (especially in the mobile browser market), this announcement is indeed very significant. Having been involved in creating mobile services for a few years now, Ajit Jaokar believes AJAX will replace both Java ME and XHTML as the platform of choice for developing mobile applications.

Ajit Jaokar 03/04/06 05:57:57 PM EST

Hello enrique, Thomas
Just to let you know that I have not forgotten about the updated response. Its coming - hopefully in the next two weeks. Kind rgds Ajit

SYS-CON India News Desk 02/25/06 03:18:56 PM EST

Recently, Opera announced the availability of AJAX on mobile devices through their browser. Considering the popularity of Opera in the browser market (especially in the mobile browser market), this announcement is indeed very significant. Having been involved in creating mobile services for a few years now, Ajit Jaokar believes AJAX will replace both Java ME and XHTML as the platform of choice for developing mobile applications.

Ajit Jaokar 02/10/06 05:23:54 PM EST

ahh .. but .. are they all not behind Java already :) Except for the BREW crowd .. I dont know of any other entity(operator/device manufacturer - NOT supporting Java) .. and thats the irony. I will address the gaming etc issues in the updated article kind rgds Ajit

C. Enrique Ortiz 02/10/06 04:01:14 PM EST

Ajit, a lot of work has been happening over the last year to minimize fragmentation. This is done via MSA and MIDP3. Not only on the APIs but the TCKs. The fragmentation issue is not the technology, or SUN, but the implementers of the technology. And Google will not fix that either. The issue has been implementers not following the spec. Maybe due to lack of clarification, but that is what MSA and MIDP3 will address. This has long been recognized, but it is a slow process - that is the nature of having many vendors, a community, involved - that is the price we pay. As you said, this is not inherently to J2ME, the same thing may happen in AJAX. Not to mention, brower-based technology is not for sufficient for gaming.

Java ME will come strong, very strong -- all the major handset manufacturers and carriers are behind it.

ceo

Ajit Jaokar 02/10/06 02:34:30 PM EST

Interesting!
from ..
http://www.mobile-ent.biz/newsitem.php?id=782

Its the 'hundreds of times' which is significant.
>>>>
At present, mobile games development is hamstrung by the fact that one game needs to be tweaked potentially hundreds of times for different handsets. These devices all implement Java differently and have a variety of screen sizes, keyboard lay-outs and user interfaces. The cost and time implications are enormous.
>>>>
However, like I said, the problem is not inherently due to J2ME - but unfortunately - the solution is not with Sun either. I think they have ignored this for too long and now the technological leadership mantle has passed away from Sun to google et al ..

Kind rgds
Ajit

Ajit Jaokar 02/05/06 08:17:30 AM EST

thanks Thomas. Let me know and I shall include the figures in update of the article. kind rgds Ajit

Thomas Landspurg 02/05/06 07:36:28 AM EST

Ajit,

I will provide you some more accurate porting cost based on our experience. The original article, made by the CEO of a porting company, obviously put higher costs in order to sell his porting services.
Also, I do not think I take the technical approach only. As I said, your raise the good questions and issues (business models, cost of fragmentation, etc...), but you put a technical solution (Ajax) as "the" answer...
And believe me, everybody in this industry is trying to find soutions to reduce complexity. But there is always a technical shift which creates new fragmentation (exemple: alternate technologies, like FlashLite, or MobileBrowsing, video, 3D on mobile, bluetooth, nfc, or new business models, etc...) Every new techno increase fragmenation. But monthes -or years- after, situation become better for these techno but in the meantime, new ones have appears... It's a never ending story.

Games is a very specific exemple, but more generally, multimedia app are quite complex to do regarding fragmentation.

I think critical mass for J2me is here. So what prevent others app to emerge? Business model? Demands? Creativity? Technical issues?
Does the reach of critical mass for another techno will make things better? Why?

(and lastly, as a service provider, we are technology agnostic. We are providing games or services on brew, java, iMode, Flash, etc... So do not take my comment as a "Java supporter" approach)

Ajit Jaokar 02/04/06 06:58:08 PM EST

thanks Enrique ..
A note for thomas ..
I have not yet figured out how to stop comment spam from my blog. Hence, comments are generally switched off

also ..
re the porting figures I quoted .. I also referrred a source. I am not an expert in games porting. If you know better figures, let me know and I shall be happy to consider them and quote you as source.

However, a thrieving industry undeniably exists in game porting .. so .. figures aside - the principle is valid - in the sense that it should be relatively cheap to ensure that the game run across devices and across operators. In fact, companies like babel media derieve a significant part of their income from ensuring that games conform to standards(set by publishers and operators).

I am sure you know this - being CTO of in-fusio. anyway .. as I said .. more soon .. including your comment on games
Kind rgds
Ajit

C. Enrique Ortiz 02/04/06 05:39:16 PM EST

Thanks for the link. As I've said, I understand the potential of AJAX. Thin clients with rich(er) UIs and thus richer experience will happen. It is just the idea that it will displace local clients what I am arguing against. Because there are times when thin is all it is needed, and times when rich/smart clients are needed. That's all! Both are and will be complimentary... There are another aspects why connected smart clients have taken long to happen... I'll cover those later on. Thanks for your thoughts and comments.
ceo

Ajit Jaokar 02/04/06 04:47:53 PM EST

as I write .. I note a breaking story !!
http://jdj.sys-con.com/read/177620_1.htm
(IBMs support of OpenAjax but Sun not a part of it). I am not clear about the full implications of this story but am following it with great interest.

One of my key points I was writing about in response to your queries is .. technology often morphs depending on industry support. Take the humble old 'SQL'. Every vendor(such as Sybase, Informix etc) - introduced a procedural version of SQL(PLSQL in case of Oracle). SQL and PLSQL are contradiction in terms because SQL is set based(and thus by definition not procedural) whereas PLSQL is procedural. However, it happened because there was an industry demand(read developer support) behind it. To get developer support you need some sort of mass market. Thats not happening at the moment.

Sun is good at creating buzz .. but that does not translate into dollars and as Jerry Mc guire says 'Show me the money!' http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0116695/

and there are few making any on mobile apps ..

Yes, mobile Games are an industry .. but thats the point .. Games are an extension of the traditional broadcast media(and even there profitability is driven by brand support). Witness recent take over games in the mobile gaming industry.

The irony is .. we see little OTHER than games!!

If WORA were true .. we would have a raft of applications(not games) .. and sadly we dont ..

BUT ..
Three things are likely to make a big impact
a) The level of abstraction is shifting to the browser(hence cross operator and driven by players like Opera and Google) since a browser can be downloaded and updated

b) AJAX is making the browser experience better

c) Developers are supporting AJAX on the web and by extension the mobile web

plus ..
Industry heavyweights are shifting their support to AJAX(see announcement)

Lots more to say(Thomas raises the question of games for example).

By the way, I appretiate your comments and both of you will be on my blogroll in the next hour or so

I trust you appretiate that my comments are not off the cuff. I have genuinely spent a few years working with grass roots developers and know the issues first hand. Also, I have no affiliations - just the desire to create an open/cross platform ecosystem. My views on openness in the mobile data industry are well known
(and I am used to getting a lot of flak for those :) )
Kind rgds
Ajit

Ajit Jaokar 02/04/06 02:03:52 PM EST

thanks. Lets swap notes when we do. Like I said, I have also been working with mobile apps for a few years now and the biggest problem I find is - the lack of a critical mass. My view is - if a company like Opera - creates a compelling platform through Ajax and that platform can be accessed cross operator and furthur - it can be updated via a browser just like on the web - it does overcome the problem of critical mass.

The fragmentation occurs not just from a specific software version of a platform but also because operators and device manufacturers can choose to implemenet it differently. With a browser(cross operator becasuse it can be downloaded and updated on any smartphone), the mobile application is driven via the web. Thats a powerful proposition and one which many develeopers sorely miss at the moment. .. anyway .. more soon and I look forward to your comments. I am adding you to my personal blog blogroll.
kind rgds
Ajit

C. Enrique Ortiz 02/04/06 12:23:01 PM EST

Ajit, please note that you are talking techy too, the moment you brought up rich vs. thin clients, and fragmentation, and how it affects development. This topic is inherently techy -- it is just the way it is... Note that this is not a new topic -- I've been dealing with it for years now.

Yet, the market is still very young -- believe me, you should not discount anything yet.

If time permits, I'll also write/expand on this topic on my blog...

Cheers,
ceo

Ajit Jaokar 02/04/06 10:12:33 AM EST

thanks for your comments enrique and thomas. I am writing a seperate article on this and shall post soon. Sadly .. you are both taking a techy outlook. The problem, as I have emphasised, is not technical but commercial. Sun may create many wonderful technical solutions - but who is using it? how many operators support it? how many device manufacturers are catreing for it? Its simply more fragmentation.

Java folks do not like to be lumped with the dodos and the dinasours .. but sadly - a patchwork solution is not going to work

There is little benefit and incenctive to integrating more complex solutions as Thomas alludes to.

To recap, and a new article is on the way, we are not talking technology here .. we are talking critical mass.
J2ME cannot fulfill that because its not a technical problem.

Browser based solutions did not take off because of a relatively poor interface. That seems to have been overcome(alongwith support from developers). More soon ..

C. Enrique Ortiz 02/01/06 10:20:38 AM EST

Ajit, I do not disagree that AJAX will play an important part in mobility. AJAX will have its place. I do realize that very much. But rich clients have its place too. I explain all this on my blog. Also look at the poll. Bottom line is that both are complimentary. If you like predictions, then convergence between rich and "browsing" will be the sweet spot. (To clarify, when I speak about rich clients, I mainly speak about Java ME, as that is my domain expertise when it comes to rich clients. But hey, I also know very much about think clients too.) So just saying AJAX will replace everything else is just plain wrong. You are ignoring current user base. You are ignoring the "domain", and when AJAX vs. local is applicable. You are ignoring the new efforts that are occuring to minimize fragmentation, and you are ignoring the nature of local vs. thin applications... My point is that making such claim is just wrong and is misleading. Which is why I take the time to respond.

ceo

Thomas Landspurg 02/01/06 06:13:35 AM EST

I also add some comment here(as no comments are allowed in author's blog). Even if the mobile space issues are well pointed out (except some unrealistic numbers about porting prices), pushing Ajax as "the" solution is very naive, and even if it technically could work, will not solve any of these problems.
What I really think is that Ajax will be an important part of the mobiles solutions in the future, especially if well integrated with others parts (typically JavaMe, or eventually FlashLite)....
I've made a full entry on this topic: http://blog.landspurg.net/?p=36

C. Enrique Ortiz 01/19/06 09:38:14 PM EST

This article is wrong and is misleading. Shows misunderstanding by the author.

ceo

Ajit Jaokar 01/02/06 07:29:51 AM EST

many thanks for your comments devguy and milner kind rgds Ajit

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Discussions about cloud computing are evolving into discussions about enterprise IT in general. As enterprises increasingly migrate toward their own unique clouds, new issues such as the use of containers and microservices emerge to keep things interesting. In this Power Panel at 16th Cloud Expo, moderated by Conference Chair Roger Strukhoff, panelists addressed the state of cloud computing today, and what enterprise IT professionals need to know about how the latest topics and trends affect their organization.
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Converging digital disruptions is creating a major sea change - Cisco calls this the Internet of Everything (IoE). IoE is the network connection of People, Process, Data and Things, fueled by Cloud, Mobile, Social, Analytics and Security, and it represents a $19Trillion value-at-stake over the next 10 years. In her keynote at @ThingsExpo, Manjula Talreja, VP of Cisco Consulting Services, discussed IoE and the enormous opportunities it provides to public and private firms alike. She will share what businesses must do to thrive in the IoE economy, citing examples from several industry sectors.
There will be 150 billion connected devices by 2020. New digital businesses have already disrupted value chains across every industry. APIs are at the center of the digital business. You need to understand what assets you have that can be exposed digitally, what their digital value chain is, and how to create an effective business model around that value chain to compete in this economy. No enterprise can be complacent and not engage in the digital economy. Learn how to be the disruptor and not the disruptee.
Akana has released Envision, an enhanced API analytics platform that helps enterprises mine critical insights across their digital eco-systems, understand their customers and partners and offer value-added personalized services. “In today’s digital economy, data-driven insights are proving to be a key differentiator for businesses. Understanding the data that is being tunneled through their APIs and how it can be used to optimize their business and operations is of paramount importance,” said Alistair Farquharson, CTO of Akana.
Business as usual for IT is evolving into a "Make or Buy" decision on a service-by-service conversation with input from the LOBs. How does your organization move forward with cloud? In his general session at 16th Cloud Expo, Paul Maravei, Regional Sales Manager, Hybrid Cloud and Managed Services at Cisco, discusses how Cisco and its partners offer a market-leading portfolio and ecosystem of cloud infrastructure and application services that allow you to uniquely and securely combine cloud business applications and services across multiple cloud delivery models.
The enterprise market will drive IoT device adoption over the next five years. In his session at @ThingsExpo, John Greenough, an analyst at BI Intelligence, division of Business Insider, analyzed how companies will adopt IoT products and the associated cost of adopting those products. John Greenough is the lead analyst covering the Internet of Things for BI Intelligence- Business Insider’s paid research service. Numerous IoT companies have cited his analysis of the IoT. Prior to joining BI Intelligence, he worked analyzing bank technology for Corporate Insight and The Clearing House Payment...
"Optimal Design is a technology integration and product development firm that specializes in connecting devices to the cloud," stated Joe Wascow, Co-Founder & CMO of Optimal Design, in this SYS-CON.tv interview at @ThingsExpo, held June 9-11, 2015, at the Javits Center in New York City.
SYS-CON Events announced today that CommVault has been named “Bronze Sponsor” of SYS-CON's 17th International Cloud Expo®, which will take place on November 3–5, 2015, at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA. A singular vision – a belief in a better way to address current and future data management needs – guides CommVault in the development of Singular Information Management® solutions for high-performance data protection, universal availability and simplified management of data on complex storage networks. CommVault's exclusive single-platform architecture gives companies unp...
Electric Cloud and Arynga have announced a product integration partnership that will bring Continuous Delivery solutions to the automotive Internet-of-Things (IoT) market. The joint solution will help automotive manufacturers, OEMs and system integrators adopt DevOps automation and Continuous Delivery practices that reduce software build and release cycle times within the complex and specific parameters of embedded and IoT software systems.
"ciqada is a combined platform of hardware modules and server products that lets people take their existing devices or new devices and lets them be accessible over the Internet for their users," noted Geoff Engelstein of ciqada, a division of Mars International, in this SYS-CON.tv interview at @ThingsExpo, held June 9-11, 2015, at the Javits Center in New York City.
Internet of Things is moving from being a hype to a reality. Experts estimate that internet connected cars will grow to 152 million, while over 100 million internet connected wireless light bulbs and lamps will be operational by 2020. These and many other intriguing statistics highlight the importance of Internet powered devices and how market penetration is going to multiply many times over in the next few years.